Phi Alpha Theta lecture series: Athens Illuminated with Dr. Stephen Berry

Phi Alpha Theta Epsilon Pi presents a lecture series about the sometimes forgotten aspects of Athens' local history. From historic markers to street and building names, our surrounding landscape may appear to present a white-washed history. However, just beneath the surface is a plurality of perspectives and voices. Each of the three Athens Illuminated lectures will focus on Athens' people or places in order to help bring to light some of this past.

Dianne Harris: “Framing Los Angeles, 1960: Case Study House #22 and the Architecture of Whiteness”

Dianne Harris is Dean of the College of Humanities and professor of history at the University of Utah. She holds a doctorate in architectural history from the University of California, Berkeley and is best known for her scholarly contributions to the study of “race and space” – the relationship between the built environment and construction of racial and class identities.

Jim Grossman, American Historical Association: "Preparing Historians for the Future Instead of the Past”

Half of all history Ph.D's end up in tenured or tenure-track positions in colleges and universities. Only one-third of those are in research universities.  Are our Ph.D programs therefore preparing most graduate students for careers they are unlikely to have?   Except for faculty at a few elite research universities, historians no longer spend their professional lives just writing books and articles, lecturing in the style of the “50 minute essay,” conducting seminars, and mentoring advanced students.  Moreover, one-fourth of our Ph.D.

“‘Things Other than Babies and the Kitchen’: Dutch Domesticity and U.S. Public Diplomacy in the Early Cold War”

This is a public lecture by David J. Snyder, Faculty Principal of the Carolina International House and Senior Instructor of History at the University of South Carolina. His work has appeared in Diplomatic History and the sJournal of Cold War Studies as well as other journals and anthologies. He is the co-editor, most recently, of Reasserting America in the 1970s: U.S.

Guest speaker: Joseph Kelly, 2017 Franklin-Liverpool Graduate Research Fellow

Joseph Kelly, a doctoral candidate from the University of Liverpool, will  present his research Tuesday afternoon entitled, "Shareholder Anti-Slavery? Capitalism and Slavery in the Joint-Stock Economy." 

Kelly is a 2017 Franklin-Liverpool Graduate Research Fellow. His week-long research stay at UGA is sponsored by the Franklin-Liverpool Graduate Research Fellowship program and Franklin College, and the History Department.

The university community is invited to attend. Pizza will be served.

#Throwback Therapies: History of Medical Science Series Lecture

Dr. Mattern will be discussing "Structure and Meaning in the Case Records of the Massachusetts General Hospital (New England Journal of Medicine.)" Dr. Mattern teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in World History and in the history of Greece, Rome, ancient Egypt, marriage, disease, medicine, women, and law. Her most recent book is The Prince of Medicine: Galen in the Roman Empire (Oxford University Press 2013). It is a social-historical biography of the ancient physician Galen, a cultural icon whose works were the basis of western medicine until the Renaissance.

Guest lecture: James F. Brooks (U California - Santa Barbara)

James F. Brooks is professor of history and anthropology at University of California, Santa Barbara, and the author of Captives and Cousins, which received the Bancroft, Francis Parkman, and Frederick Douglass Prizes. He will give a talk entitled, "Mesa of Sorrows: Archaeology, History, and Community in the Destruction of Awat’ovi Pueblo" Friday afternoon.

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