The U.S. in the First World War: Richard Shawn Faulkner – “Mud, Blood, and Dysentery: The Doughboy’s Life in Battle”

Richard Shawn Faulkner will give a talk on “Mud, Blood, and Dysentery: The Doughboy’s Life in Battle” as part of The U.S. in the First World War, a lecture series commemorating the centennial of the entrance of the United States into World War I, sponsored by the department of history and the Willson Center.

Chad Williams: the wartime experience of African American soldiers in World War I

Chad Williams will give a talk on the wartime experience of African American soldiers in World War I and the rise of the New Negro as part of The U.S. in the First World War, a lecture series commemorating the centennial of the entrance of the United States into World War I, sponsored by the department of history and the Willson Center.

Chad Williams is associate professor of African and Afro-American studies at Brandeis University. He is the author of Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era.

Friends of Gospel Pilgrim Information Session: New UGA Student Service Organization

Please join us for information on a new UGA service organization, "friends of Gospel Pilgrim. Friends of Gospel Pilgrim is committed to service work to help restore and cleanup local historical African American cemeteries. The university community is invited to attend. All majors, students, staff and faculty are welcome.

PIZZA will be served!
 

Service Day - Friends of Gospel Pilgrim

Friends of Gospel Pilgrim, a UGA student service organization, is hosting a service day at Gospel Pilgrim Cemetery this Saturday, August 26th, from 9-12. Gospel Pilgrim is a historic African American cemetery in Athens in need of care and maintenance. Please come on out and help us preserve this piece of Athens' history!

For more information about the service day and to let us know you are coming please check out our FaceBook event.

Lunchtime Time Machine: What did imaginary cities look like in the Middle Ages?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Ari Levine. Professor Levine specializes in the cultural and intellectual history of early modern China, and he teaches courses in Chinese, East Asian, and world history. He is the author of Divided by a Common Language: Factional Conflict in Late Northern Song China, and he’s currently completing a book project on urban space and cultural memory in the Northern Song capital of Kaifeng.

Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: Who opened the U.S. - Mexican border?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Cindy Hahamovitch. Professor Hahamovitch is the author of two books: The Fruits of Their Labor: Atlantic Coast Farmworkers and the Making of Migrant Poverty, 1870-1945 (1997) and the triple prize-winning No Man's Land: Jamaican Guestworkers in America and the Global History of Deportable Labor (2011).

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