Lunchtime Time Machine: How did Iraqi poets spark a revolution?

This installment of the History Department’s undergraduate lecture series is presented by Dr. Kevin Jones. Professor Jones teaches courses in the history of the Middle East, and he is currently writing a book on the political functions of poetry in Iraq between the first and second world wars.

Students of all majors welcome. Free pizza. This is an FYO event.

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Lunchtime Time Machine: Why did a conservative housewife, an accountant, and the 1964 Republican presidential nominee go green?

This installment of the History Department’s undergraduate lecture series is presented by Dr. Brian Drake. Professor Drake teaches the second half of the U.S. history survey and courses in environmental history. His recent book, Loving Nature, Fearing the State, focuses on the relationship of the postwar American environmental movement to postwar politics and ideology.

Students of all majors welcome. Free pizza. This is an FYO event.

Lunchtime Time Machine: How did ancient love spells work?

This installment of the History Department’s undergraduate lecture series is presented by Dr. Susan Mattern. Professor Mattern’s most recent book, The Prince of Medicine, is a social-historical biography of the ancient physician Galen, and she is currently working on a global history of menopause. She teaches courses in the history of ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, marriage, disease, medicine, women, and law.

Students of all majors wlecome. Free pizza. This is an FYO event.

Lunchtime Time Machine: Did Europeans ever stop “going medieval” on each other?

This installment of the History Department’s undergraduate lecture series is presented by Dr. Steve Soper. Professor Soper teaches the second half of the western civ survey and courses on modern Europe, Italy, and microhistory. He is working on a new book about political prisoners in southern Italy on the eve of Italian unification.  

Students of all majors are welcome. Free pizza. This is an FYO event.

 

Douglas A. Blackmon, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II"

David Blackmon will present his talk Thursday at UGA's Dean Rusk Hall.  He spent more than two decades as a daily newspaper reporter and bureau chief and won his first Pulitzer Prize for The Wall Street Journal staff's breaking news coverage of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.

Civil Rights Historian Tomiko Brown-Nagin: "‘The Civil Rights Queen': Constance Baker Motley and the Struggle for Racial and Gender Equality in America."

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, the Daniel P. S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law and a professor of history at Harvard University, will present "‘The Civil Rights Queen': Constance Baker Motley and the Struggle for Racial and Gender Equality in America."

Food Chains Film Screening (Latin American Sustainable Agriculture Initiative)

Join the Latin American Sustainable Agriculture Initiative for a screening of Food Chains. This exposé documents the human cost of food by focusing on the lives of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, a group of Florida farmworkers, that battle the $4 trillion global supermarket industry through their Fair Food program.

After the screening, a panel of discussants will talk about their research and lives as it relates to this important film. Discussants include:

Visiting lecturer Peter Wood: “Did you ever hear ‘bout de Andersonville prison in Georgia?”

 A fresh sesquicentennial look at a familiar Civil War topic--Peter Wood (Professor Emeritus, Duke U) is an American historian and author of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion (1974). It has been described as one of the most influential books on southern U.S. history of the past 50 years.

The university community is invited to attend.

Sponsored by the Department of History.

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