Lunchtime Time Machine: What's the difference between a licit and illicit drug?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Timothy Yang. Professor Yang joined the history faculty this year, so now you can look forward to his courses on the history of East Asia, Japan, science and medicine, capitalism, and memory. He is writing a book that explores the connections between medicine, capitalism, and empire through a micro-history of a Japanese pharmaceutical company. Free admission, free pizza.

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Lunchtime Time Machine: What did mosquitos do before Zika?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Cassia Roth. Professor Roth joined the history faculty this year, so now you can look forward to her courses on the history of Latin America, Brazil, gender, and medicine. She is writing a book entitled Birthing Abolition: Reproduction and the Gradual End of Slavery in Brazil. Free admission, free pizza.

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Lunchtime Time Machine: Why are there so many Confederate monuments?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Akela Reason. Professor Reason teaches courses on the history of American cities, material culture, and public history. She is also the founder of the Department of History’s Summer Program in Public History in Washington, DC. She is currently preparing a study of the politics of Civil War monuments in New York City during the Gilded Age. Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: Why was communism so popular in Iraq?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Kevin Jones. Professor Jones teaches courses on the history of the medieval and modern Middle East, and his research interests include the subjects of nationalism, anti-colonialism, and poetry. He is writing a book entitled The Poetics of Revolution: Culture, Politics, and Modernity in Iraq, 1914-1963. Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: Why did the Germans under Hitler remain Nazis to the bitter end?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. John Morrow, Jr. Professor Morrow teaches courses on the history of modern Europe and of warfare and society. He has been a visiting professor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and at National Air and Space Museum (NASM).

The Dirtiest Work of All: Manual Scavenging, a Caste-Based Occupation in India

With an introduction by Jay Driskell, author of Hard Work: A History of Sanitation and the Teamsters.

Part of the “Dirty Work” conference (www.southernlaborstudies.org), which is funded by the UGA Department of History, the Provost, the Vice President for Research, the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the Southern Historical Association, the Southern Labor Archives, and the University of Georgia Press.

Free and open to the public.

 

History Pop-up Exhibit!

Students in Prof. Soper's crime and punishment class are setting up their own pop-up exhibit, on display at the Russell Special Collections Building, Room 285, on Friday, April 27 from 1 to 2:30.  The title of the exhibit is "Unlocking Georgia:  Law, Crime, and Punishment."  Stop by and see the great items the students have found in our special collections!

Spring '18 History Class on-line evaluations April 16-26

Student on-line history course evaluations are available April 16 - 26 at eval.franklin.uga.edu. Evaluations may be submitted during this time prior to the first day of final exams, at which time submissions will be closed. This is for history courses taught by the department of history. Students registered in large survey classes that have breakout discussion groups will have two evaluations to submit for such a class - one for the instructor and one for the teaching assistant.

UGA NAACP Image Awards

The University of Georgia Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) will host our 8th Annual NAACP Image Awards Ceremony on Thursday April 12th, 2018 at 7:00 PM in the Memorial Ballroom located in Memorial Hall. This year’s theme is: “20 Years of Black Excellence”.  We will recognize the outstanding achievements and contributions of our students, faculty, staff, and community members who promote social justice locally and abroad and advance the mission of the NAACP. 

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