302 LeConte
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Ph.D.
New York University
History
2004

Stephen Mihm is the author, with Nouriel Roubini, of Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance (Penguin Press, 2010) and A Nation of Counterfeiters: Capitalists, Con Men, and the Making of the United States (Harvard University Press, 2007). He is also the co-editor, with Katherine Ott and David Serlin, of Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics (NYU, 2002).   He is also the author of a number of peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and academic essays. 

In recent years, Mihm has been the recipient of numerous fellowships, awards, and grants, including the biennial Harold F. Williamson Prize, given to a mid-career scholar for contributions to the teaching and writing of business history; a two-year, $188,000 grant from the National Science Foundation; and the History Department's Parks Heggoy Graduate Teaching Award in both 2012 and 2014.  He has also received a number of major fellowships from, among other institutions, the American Council of Learned Societies; the Smithsonian Institution; and the Harvard Business School, where he served as the Newcomen Postdoctoral Fellowship in Business History in 2003-2004.

Mihm is presently writing a history of standards and standardization in the United States for Harvard University Press; he is also preparing an edited volume for Bedford Publishing as well as several peer-reviewed articles and essays.  In addition to his academic duties, Mihm is a weekly columnist for Bloomberg View as well as a frequent contributor to the New York Times, Boston Globe, and many other newspapers and magazines.  He also appears regularly in historical documentaries, radio and television programs, and other print and broadcast media in the United States and abroad.

Mihm lives in Decatur, Georgia with his wife and colleague, Akela Reason, as well as their three boys, three cats, and a puppy.  

Curriculum Vitae: 
Honors: 

Harold F. Williamson Prize, Business History Conference (2014). Biennial award given by the BHC to a “mid-career” scholar “who has made significant contributions to the teaching and writing of business history.”

Research Grant, National Science Foundation (2014).  Two-year grant awarded via the NSF’s Social and Economic Sciences Division to underwrite research and writing of book on the history of standards and standardization.  Total funding: $188,018.

Research Fellowship, Willson Center for the Humanities and Arts, University of Georgia (2013).  University-wide competitive grant for release from teaching enabling work on book about the history of standards and standardization.

Parks-Heggoy Graduate Teaching Award, History Department, University of Georgia (2012, 2014).  Two-time winner of annual departmental award given by history graduate students in recognition of excellence in graduate instruction.

Provost’s Summer Research Grant, University of Georgia (2012).  Research funds awarded via university-wide competition for archival research on a history of standards and standardization in the United States.

“Top 10 Books of the Year,” list compiled by book review critic Michiko Kakutani, New York Times (2010).  In  recognition of Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance, book co-authored with economist Nouriel Roubini.

Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship, American Council of Learned Societies, New York, New York (2009).  Given to advanced assistant and untenured associate professors for an academic year of research and leave from teaching responsibilities.

Teaching American History Grant, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. (2009).  Served as one of the lead historians in a three-year, $995,897 grant organized by project director Dr. Katherine Wright, Northeast Georgia Regional Educational Service Agency.

Elected Member, American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts (2008).   Honor given “in recognition of scholarship, for support of cultural institutions, for manifest interest in bibliographical matters, or for distinction as community or national leaders in humanistic affairs.”

Courses Taught

U.S. History to 1865

Stephen Mihm's Selected Publications