History at Work: Grad school in history

Normally History at Work is dedicated to the non-obvious ways that you can put your degree to use after college, but this installment is dedicated to an option that is probably familiar but also maybe a bit mysterious. Professors Jones, Kreiner, Palmer, and Rood will talk about how grad school in history works, what the job market looks like, what the application process involves, and whatever else the audience wants to know.

Jim Grossman, American Historical Association: "Preparing Historians for the Future Instead of the Past”

Half of all history Ph.D's end up in tenured or tenure-track positions in colleges and universities. Only one-third of those are in research universities.  Are our Ph.D programs therefore preparing most graduate students for careers they are unlikely to have?   Except for faculty at a few elite research universities, historians no longer spend their professional lives just writing books and articles, lecturing in the style of the “50 minute essay,” conducting seminars, and mentoring advanced students.  Moreover, one-fourth of our Ph.D.

Lunchtime Time Machine: How did slaves survive the Civil War?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Scott Nesbit. Professor Nesbit uses digital tools to tackle questions about the history and spaces of the American South. He has led digital history projects such as Visualizing Emancipation, which used a wide array of textual sources — ranging from military correspondence to runaway slave advertisements found in southern newspapers — to map out where and when slavery fell apart during the American Civil War. 

Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: How is the jellyfish the allegorical figure of global capitalism?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. John Short. Professor Short teaches courses on the intellectual and cultural history of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He is the author of Magic Lantern Empire: Colonialism and Society in Germany. He is currently working on a project that explores the idea and limits of global consciousness.

Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: Why did punks hate hippies?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Montgomery Wolf. Professor Wolf teaches the first and second halves of the U.S. survey course and upper-division courses on modern America and American popular music. She is finishing a book manuscript titled We Accept You, One of US? Punk Rock, Community, and Individualism in an Uncertain Era.

Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: How do you counterfeit money (in nineteenth-century America)?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Stephen Mihm. Professor Mihm teaches the second half of the U.S. survey and upper-division courses on nineteenth-century America and on the history of American capitalism. He the is author of A Nation of Counterfeiters: Capitalists, Con Men, and the Making of the United States and co-author of Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance.

Free admission, free pizza.

Lunchtime Time Machine: Why do Brazilian politicians shoot each other so often?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Bryan Pitts. Professor Pitts teaches courses on the history of Latin America and Brazil. He is currently writing a book titled The Inadvertent Opposition: Politicians, Social Movements, and the Demise of Brazil’s Military Regime, and he has written on contemporary Brazilian politics for a variety of media outlets in both English and Portuguese.

Free admission, free pizza. 

Lunchtime Time Machine: How did Roman toilets work?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Susan Mattern. Professor Mattern teaches courses in world history and in the history of Greece, Rome, ancient Egypt, marriage, medicine, disease, women, and law. She has written several books, including most recently The Prince of Medicine, a biography of the ancient physician Galen, and she is currently working on mental disorders in antiquity and a global history of menopause. 

Free admission, free pizza. 

Lunchtime Time Machine: Why did everybody expect the Spanish Inquisition?

This installment of the Department of History’s undergraduate lecture series features Dr. Benjamin Ehlers. Professor Ehlers teaches courses on the history of early modern Spain and England, European encounters with Islam, and transnationalism. He is the author of Between Christians and Moriscos: Juan de Ribera and Religious Reform in Valencia, 1568-1614. 

Free admission, free pizza. 

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